Making Sense Common

Holistic: Cosmic Conundrum or Common Sense?

Making Sense Common8-aspects

Holistic, adj.

1. Of or relating to holism.

a. Emphasizing the importance of the whole and the interdependence of its parts.

b. Concerned with wholes rather than analysis or separation into parts

Defining the variety of subsets in the equations we consider for our daily living decisions have been the norm for many years. Not that we are necessarily mathematical in nature; simply that we calculate our actions to produce results whether we realize it or not. Our brains are like supercomputers that operate nearly unconsciously in the process, spitting out answers just in time to move our bodies or open our mouths. When defining ‘holistic,’ do we consider a systems approach?

We tend to focus on the immediate and be less aware of the larger picture of our lives and how we interact with the world. The latter growing general awareness reveals that indeed we are ‘connected to everything.’ This understanding is creeping into the consciousness of a growing segment of society. Some see things as being connected with some half-baked idea of oneness, but don’t know how to put it into practical use. On the other end of the spectrum, scientists are grappling with the concepts contained in quantum mechanics, still an idea of oneness and again with no practical outcome to date. What if we perceived the world as whole already and looked backward to see how we became so intimately engaged.

Now when this concept is cascaded through layers of patterned behavior and outcome, change is possible. Peering into the depths of what keeps us afraid, angry, ignorant and immobile might reveal the best way out. If we determine the bottlenecks, we can free the flow. In theory, harmony among people and planet is possible using current metrics in the applied sciences. We have ways to analyze and chart superior systems and know how they work.

Inquiring Minds Must Know

So what does that really mean? Let us explore some relevant data.

Peter Senge introduced the “systems thinking” model to the business world in the ’90s. He notes four disciplines, integrated by a fifth. Personal mastery, mental models, building shared vision and team learning are synergized by systems thinking. Basically ‘systems thinking’ is a way of viewing an environment from a broader perspective that includes seeing overall structures, patterns and cycles in systems, rather than seeing only specific events in the system. Those same patterns are likely to appear as fractals throughout any organization. Similarly, the human system is rarely considered in the process of personal growth and, instead of a whole view, we look at a specific behavior as the focus for change.

“A high-functioning system continually exchanges feedback among its various parts to ensure that they remain closely aligned and focused on achieving the goal of the system. If any of the parts or activities in the system seems weakened or misaligned, the system makes necessary adjustments to more effectively achieve its goals.” (Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC., 2007)

Could we apply this view to people and planet as we move into the new millennium? What about off-planet relationships? How about applying it to our body/mind/spirit/soul complex? In the concept of holistic systems we can extrapolate a theory of what oneness might look like from a logistical standpoint. No, that doesn’t mean from a mountaintop. It means we can begin to grasp being able to step out of the old paradigm of separation and stagnation.

Holistic health and medicine present a myriad of modalities capable of addressing the plethora of perturbations within the mind/body/spirit/soul or ‘system’ of our individual consciousness. In essence, we are vibration in motion affected by subtle biochemical and physiological changes for the most part. Now we must include environmental changes as our air, land and water have questionable purity. We also know that where we are affects many aspects of our health and mental clarity.

Indeed we are inextricably connected to the world around and within us. We feel sensations, but are challenged to describe them. Apparently we are not used to looking within yet. What about treating the whole person instead of just symptoms?

Holy Water or Stinking Thinking

Dr. Masaru Emoto’s research on water crystals, feelings and thoughts suggests that we have a profound capacity to affect ourselves and our environment. We are roughly 60% water or so. Just imagine the affect our thoughts and feelings have on each of us. What are you thinking about now? What was your last inspiring thought? How did that feel? When was your last desperate thought? How did that feel? Choice is optional.

Scientific discoveries continue to validate what mystics have espoused for years – our thinking affects our reality; the observer’s thoughts and feelings directly affect the experiment. Science and spirituality speak with one voice.

Are we listening? How do we think and feel in a holistic fashion that is life-friendly and supportive of change? Are we aware of the thoughtmosphere, the repository of intelligence we all share and how accessible it really is?

Holistic ecology reflects the argument made that “in order to move toward greener societies, homogeneity and universalism will have to be replaced by recognition of the importance of cultural, biological, and epistemological diversity. Without such diversity, the options for life itself are removed. We are all related at our core.

Indigenous peoples appreciate this diversity. Without such diversity, the options for life itself are removed. Collectively, they embody cultural and epistemological diversity, and by their very character respect the importance of the diversity that exists within the natural world.” (Timothy Boston, University of Tasmania, Australia).

Holistic education is a multi-leveled experiential journey of discovery, expression and mastery where all students and teachers learn and grow together. Holistic education recognizes the innate potential of EVERY student for intelligent, creative, systemic thinking. Holistic learning is organized around relationships within and between learners and their environment while empowering learners to live fully in the present and to co-create preferred futures.

Holistic curriculum is inquiry driven, interdisciplinary and integrated, and is based on explicit assumptions of interconnectedness, wholeness and multi-dimensional being. (Holistic Education Network of Tasmania, Australia).

How We Are Who We Are

You might want to ‘google’ Howard Gardner’s ‘multiple intelligences’ and Daniel Goleman’s ‘emotional intelligences’ to garner greater understanding of how we learn and work in the world. Suffice it to say we are very complex beings with very simple motivations and a natural urge to merge runs through our entire being. As we explore the notion of universal order or cosmic consciousness there is a certain inspired logic the permeates the thoughtmosphere.

We create relation ships on the ocean of emotion, usually buffeted by our inability to control our own emotions, driven by our desire to control. Emotion that is, operating our minds and bodies after a response is called for, instead of remaining quiet and observing the prudent path. Sense becomes common in our listening. When we step back we can see a bigger picture, a broader scope of how possibilities can coagulate to move the foundation of behavior to a higher order.

The growing wisdom about creating a ‘holistic’ relationship with the people and planet flows across multiple industries and the burgeoning global economy, not to mention echoing in the thoughtmosphere of a conscience that appears as a new trend toward ethical behavior. “This broader view and inclusive approach to personal and professional endeavors is challenging patterns of behavior and the ‘old way’ of doing business.” Daniel Pink

Change agents are melding with Cultural Creatives™ as the need for holistic practices in business is met. Business as usual, driven by profit and loss statements, is transforming into something much greater today as some individuals and companies are necessarily redefining their vision and mission statements to reflect a new mindset. To note a recent milestone, the International Standards Organization brought representatives together from 90 countries with the task of creating social responsibility standards. The ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standards Draft copy is available at PlanetaryCitizens.net

The ratified copy was released in December of 2010 and provides a holistic approach to doing business and corporate behavior. This very well could be the tool that we can use to change the behavior of the corporatocracy. We certainly aren’t going to get rid of them, so let’s get them to act a little differently. After all, it is the internal informal communication fostered by management and employees that drives a company. Can you imagine an internal change that would foster ethical and responsible behavior?

A New Paradigm of Inclusion

The new 21st Century mindset includes a ‘holistic’ view, yet focuses on the practical elements that engage a new living awareness. After all, it is our awareness that changes and because of that change the world around us appears to change. When that change occurs to harmonize and resonate with natural patterns, rhythms and timing there is a shift. That is the shift we seek as we move into the new galactic year, another spin around the center of our galaxy. The current fragmentation of our society and developing global village demand a new view.

Might a holistic perspective seeking harmony among people and planet through best practices help? Einstein alluded that this might be an aspect of quantum entanglement, where the universe is seeking to reveal itself through extraordinary ordinary means, like learning to get along so we can care for each other without fear. Perhaps focusing on the health and well-being of a planetary civilization is more appropriate given our understanding of attention and intention.

Evidence of advancing connectivity and an evolving new view, a holistic world view model, is showing up in the co-creation wheel model that both the Thrive website and the Shift Movement. I wonder if Gamble and Marx-Hubbard conferred? Are there more folks climbing on the bandwagon for a holistic system emergence on the planet? I’m sure if you look around there are many other examples, like IBM’s Smarter Planet campaign. It seems Senge’s affect on the learning organization and systems thinking is filtering through the thoughtmosphere. There is still the matter of collaboration that remains in question. It seems competition for value still reigns, even with all the talk indicating otherwise.

How do we create value in the 21st Century? How do we create bridges for a holistic systems approach to planetary administration and merge diversity effectively? Whether we fear or welcome it, there is a ‘new world order’ that is emerging. How do we, as planetary citizens, make sure that the momentum takes us toward living as ONE – one people, one planet, one time?

It all seems to make perfect sense when we realize that there are enough resources to feed, clothe, house and provide health care for everyone. We’ve placed the economics of war over human life, though, and that mindset has to change soon or we’ll self-destruct. Even with those supposedly working for ‘good’… are they more interested in sharing or selling you something? The truly confusing piece of information is that we spend more money on corporate and military functions than, if redirected, would provide more than enough funds to feed, clothe, house and care for everyone. Of course those are statistics, but what if they are true?

Donald Keys, speech writer for U Thant in the 60s, coined the phrase Planetary Citizen on the way to creating The New World Alliance. The United Nations had some great leadership in these mean, attempting to create a holistic view of the world at that time.

From Donald Keys circa 1982… “To cross over the threshold and enter into a world of new and exciting promise requires us to fulfill the tasks immediately before us: first, to become aware; second, to accept responsibility for the human situation; third, to acquire skills; and fourth, to act wisely and well, consciously and continuously on behalf of… a better future for humanity.”

So now that we’ve made it past the latest bump in the road, let’s opt for a true apocalypse and transform our way of looking at the world, our lives and our relationships.

If you like what you’ve read so far, you might enjoy my book – Are We ONE?: https://www.createspace.com/3452312

Enjoy and Share with Friends!
6 thoughts on “Making Sense Common
  1. Expanded Mission: We believe our first responsibility is to prepare the students to meet the challenges of the rapidly changing world around them. The growing population of displaced youth need hope in what appears to them as a love-starved world. Holistic strategies in a peer-based community atmosphere encourage students to perceive and understand the various contexts which shape and give meaning to life. Introducing students to a holistic view of the planet, life on Earth, and the emerging world community demonstrates systems thinking. The environment and staff will nurture the development of emotional and multiple intelligences empowering each student’s personal growth. Engaging systems thinking requires student involvement in the research and design of their educational process which creates ownership of learning. A collaborative approach toward problem-solving develops critical interpersonal skills. Emerging technologies and their integration into our curriculum provide the students with real-time, real-world experiences that prepare them for entering post-secondary life.

    • Thanks for the wonderful sharing, Elma… wink, wink.

      I see you’ve visited Spectrum Academy’s website. I truly hope that someday that vision will come true. We do have a responsibility to our youth that I believe we, as a nation, have completely disregarded. Instead of doing what we tell them to do – analyze, evaluate, synthesize and demonstrate – we continue to use an archaic system that was designed to put people into assembly lines during times of war. By and large people are lazy and if someone is going to do something (apparently for the benefit of others) few stop to consider the ramifications or long-term viability. Now we’re facing a massive shortage of qualified people to perform the tasks that the information age has spawned. We still haven’t learned to look long-term and find ourselves at the mercy of those who have, only for their benefit.

  2. The holistic approach to health addresses the whole person: body, mind and spirit. One of the most important principles is that one must care for self – within your body, mind and spirit for the holistic journey to optimal health. Holistic health care practitioners view people as the unity of body, mind, spirit and the environments in which they live.

    • Thanks for commenting, Patrica.

      Indeed, holistic health does address the whole person. We, as a society, have been bereft of the collaborative or collective means to address the whole person to date. Our approach has been more to specialize in specific areas as a result of problems emerging rather than being focused on wellness in the first place. Education does the same thing, ripping kids out of their natural rhythms and forcing them into regimens that don’t necessarily serve them at all. We’ve been adaptable to that as humans, but the drop-out rates of recent are horrendous. We simply aren’t meeting their needs.

  3. the holistic management system can be applied to other areas with multiple complex socioeconomic and environmental factors. One such example is Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), which promotes sector integration in development and management of water resources to ensure that water is allocated between different users in a fair way, maximizing economic and social welfare without compromising the sustainability of vital ecosystems. In essence, coordinated, holistic water management that takes in consideration all water users in nature and society.

    • Thanks for commenting, Martin.

      You are spot on. Water management affects ecosystems. Ecosystems support a diverse environment of flora and fauna beyond the human element, if there is one. Whether that human element is present or not, their regard or disregard for treating the management scenario as a holistic system determines the long-term sustainability of that environment. Goldratt’s work brought out the idea of ‘bottlenecks’ in working systems at a facility or production plant level. Senge addressed holistic systems at an organizational level. Addressing global systems is yet something I am not sure we are prepared to do yet. We can’t even get along and profit often precipitates war instead of managed care of nature and society.

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