What is a Real Galactic Year?

galactichunab3What is a real galactic year?

A Matter of Perspective

The end of 2013 was challenging for me and my family.

Dad transitioned on Christmas Eve day. It was a great gift for him, having weathered a bout with Parkinson’s and its debilitating effects. Mom is suffering from Dementia, so it made it doubly hard for him in the end as he was more concerned for her than himself.

One good thing about the condition, sort of, is that she processed his passing rather quickly. I was not so blessed and his presence in my life lives on, deeply embedded in my efforts to serve the world.

Speaking of serving, last year seemed to have a clearing affect on my life in that everything that was a distraction was removed. I’ve been through those kinds of periods before, but they were short-lived and certainly less devastating. However, my prayers had been for release from everything that was keeping me from fulfilling a larger calling, one I’d been aware of since a teenager but that was not necessarily something I wanted to share with just anyone. The nature of the experience tends to repel most folks because it threatens their belief systems.

The notion of belief systems leads me into the title of this post and the choice of dating. Jose Arguelles and I had a conversation years ago that began a serious investigation into the nature of time for me. Later, he introduced the Law of Time as a need for the conversion to a lunar calendar because it is in harmony with natural cycles, something humans have discarded and ignored for the most part. Several calendars converged at the Winter Solstice in 2012 as the end/beginning of a cycle, a galactic year. Most agree this is a 26,000 year cycle where the Earth has traveled around the center of the Milky Way Galaxy.

After doing some research, though, the science estimates of the length of one orbit range from 225 to 250 million “terrestrial” years. According to NASA, the Solar System is traveling at an average speed of 828,000 km/h (230 km/s) or 514,000 mph (143 mi/s) relative to the galactic center, which is about one 1300th of the speed of light. If you could travel at that speed in a jet aircraft along the equator, you would go all the way around the world in approximately 2 minutes and 54 seconds. According to NASA, even at this incredible speed, it still takes the solar system 230 million years to orbit the center of the Milky Way Galaxy one time.

So, why the confusion?

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